Church and Society


CREATING CHANGE TOGETHER THROUGH CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

Historically the United Methodist Church has been committed to connecting “faith and life, church and society, and justice and peace.”  The General Board of Church and Society has created the document,  “CREATING CHANGE TOGETHER:  A Toolkit for Faithful Civic Engagement.”  The General  Secretary, Susan Henry-Crowe, writes:  “If every United Methodist put their faith into action, just think about the change we could create together.”

Social Principles of the United Methodist Church provides guidelines for our task… https://www.umcjustice.org/who-we-are/social-principles-and-resolutions

Our Social Principles are grounded in Scripture and provide a foundation and guide for putting our faith into action. Voting is an opportunity to help create change through civic engagement in our democracy.  Download the Toolkit at https://www.umcjustice.org/documents/119. Links to more resources are at https://www.umcjustice.org/what-you-can-do/advocacy/take-action/creating-change-together

For the upcoming 2020 General Election here are more guidelines for civic engagement.

The official government website:  https://www.usa.gov.  It is a secure site with all the information you need to make sure your vote is counted. You can learn about the following:

  • Change Your Voter Registration
    • Confirm You’re Registered to Vote
    • How to Get a Voter Registration Card
    • How to Register to Vote
    • Voter Registration Age Requirement

For questions about your ballot

Go to:  https://www.ballotready.org/.  It is a secure site which provides background information on the candidates and ballot measures. They’ll list the candidates by race and offer details on each one’s experience and goals. They’ll explain any ballot measures, which are specific questions or issues that you can approve or reject. 

The site offers voter guides by home address nationwide. You can save your choices online and print or email your personalized ballot to bring with you to the polls.

Regional newspapers often produce voter guides, as do issue-specific organizations.

Church and Society Committee